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Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 17 total)
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  • in reply to: Annual Gathering Thanks to the organisers #34618
    Edward Irving
    Participant

    Thanks George it was really good to see you. Thanks for coming along

    in reply to: Annual Gathering Papplewick #34315
    Edward Irving
    Participant

    Thanks to Jason the programme for the Annual Gathering has now been published on the events page of the web site. If anyone has any question please just let me know. Best wishes everyone Edward

    in reply to: Handlebars/Sparkplugs #33483
    Edward Irving
    Participant

    Love it !

    in reply to: New Member from North Germany #33480
    Edward Irving
    Participant

    Hi Frank

    Welcome to the Scott Owners Club and to the World of Scotts. You are very welcome.

    It difficult for me to tell from the photos what your your bike is. If you can tell us the engine and frame number then we could have a look at the clubs records and perhaps tell you a bit more about the bike.

    On the one hand I have found Scotts quite simple to work on but there are some complexities particularly with regard to engine. Parts can usually be found from the Scott Owners Club spares scheme or from helpful members of the club. If you need something it can usually be found with some searching.

    Don’t worry about your english, mine is dreadful lol

    Edward

     

     

    in reply to: Handlebars/Sparkplugs #33479
    Edward Irving
    Participant

    Hi Leif I like the beer can suggestion thats a top idea

    in reply to: TT rep brake adjuster #33478
    Edward Irving
    Participant

    Hi Martin

    Hope your keeping well

    I am not sure which bit your referring to. If you have a pic I will look and see what I can find

    All the best

    Edward

    in reply to: 2 speeder drippers #33009
    Edward Irving
    Participant

    Hi I have recently serviced the drippers on my 1925 super and I obtained the parts from Rod Lloyd who specilises in Best and Lloyd glass and seals. If you type his name into google his details will come up he has a facebook page with all of the details.

    Good luck

    Edward

    in reply to: Lucas E3L dynamo drive gear #31069
    Edward Irving
    Participant

    Hi everyone I have only just read the post sorry. I have a spare gear, there where two in a box of E3L parts I purchased 3 or maybe 4 years ago. If anyone needs another let me know

    • This reply was modified 2 years, 7 months ago by Edward Irving.
    in reply to: 1929 Tourer BF8746 #30911
    Edward Irving
    Participant

    Thanks Glyn and I hope everyone is keeping well

    I next dismantled the clutch and I have to say it was in a bit of a state, very rusty with gunk and grease covering the whole thing. A good spray with gunk, a quick wash off and just a little heat and everything came apart. Now I don’t have a lot of experience with cork clutches in the past I have used the bonded type on my Yamaha race bike and when I was bantam racing we used steel on steel (different hardnesses) plates which meant you could slip the clutch going into a corner to maintain revs so you had plenty of power when you went to come out of the other side. Anyhow some of the cork simply fell out of the plates and the basket, some looked very shiny I suppose from friction and all of the metal plates had the tangs bent or dented. I decided not for the first time that if a job is worth doing its worth doing well an ordered a new basket, plates and springs from the spares scheme. These where the resin bonded type and when I received them I was very please to see how well made they are. The clutch went back together without a problem but similarly to the gear box I had to reassemble it about four times. I think it was a case of just doing things in the correct order. Now I am writing this its got me thinking about the old clutch. If anyone can point me in the direction of an article on clutch cork I would be glad to read it.

    One or two final points on the clutch, the original seals where i guess made of felt dipped in tallow? and where not actually in bad condition. They where however quite badly misshaped so I ordered new clutch sealy made from modern materials from Richard at Scott Parts. They went in and finally I had a a clutch attached to the gearbox ready to go back into the bike. I also picked up an old set of box spanners on eBay for a few pounds that allowed me to tighten the bolt which retains the clutch onto the main shaft.

    Next job was to get the wheels back in the frame and have a rolling chassis

    Keep safe everyone

    Edward

     

     

    in reply to: 1929 Tourer BF8746 #30802
    Edward Irving
    Participant

    Oh one other thing, kick starts. The bike came with a complete kickstart, many of the parts where purchased from the spares scheme nut should the kick start lever be straight or cranked?? I was always told cranked but the 1929 catalogue shows straight. Just another one of those Scott mystery’s …..

    in reply to: 1929 Tourer BF8746 #30797
    Edward Irving
    Participant

    Dear All

    Thats fantastic information from Lewis on Webbs, it seams to me that just about everyone copied them and before they new it identical and similar forks where being made for other bikes. The thing I found hard is when a set of forks pops up on eBay or at an auto jumble they may look like Webbs but are they? I couldn’t find a set of definitive dimensions for Webb forks on a Scott. The Webb catalogue doesn’t give dimensions and indicates that the made forks to just about all lengths widths and sizes. It’s helped now of course by the fact that I have a set of Webbs that’s are defiantly for a Scott and the vellocett owners club where I found some dimensioned information (attached) .I still wonder how they make the tapered tube, I am sure the machine used is impressive.

    So on with the build, the next thing I did was bought a lathe. I have spent many a happy hour in Roger Moss’s workshop talking about Scotts and machine tools and I have admired Rogers collection of Smart & Brown machines. Smart and Brown built lathes etc in Biggleswade not far from where I live and there machines where absolutely top notch. They didn’t make that many compared to other manufacturers, these machines where tool room lathes for very high precision work and they came at a high price. Most of the machines are huge and just too big for me but there model S or SAB lathe is small being a copy of a South Bend 9” lathe built to a very high spec. I took me ages to find one but as soon as I did I snapped it up (photo attached). I am no expert, not by a long stretch but it serves my purposes. It means I can make up things like the attached picture of a rear axle adjuster nut, in stainless!

    I now turned my attention to the gearbox. The casting its self was in good condition having never really been converted to a foot change but the end casting was in poor shape. The kickstart mechanism had obviously over time broken the cover plate and it had been welded up and repaired but it looked like a bodged job. I tried to get another from the spares scheme but it was sold out unfortunately. Salvation came when I purchased a box of bits which had an end cover which was not new but in much better shape and I decided to use this.

    Now for the gear wheels! The box had a set of old vintage wide wheels in it and they were in a sorry state, I hadn’t seen anything like it. When I purchased the bike it looked like the box had been cleaned up and was in good shape but the wheels where dreadful. It’s was the first indication I had that what I purchased was a bit of a pup. I sent the photos (attached) to Glyn Chambers who attends my local Scott meet in London Colney and he mentioned that this was probably caused by a type of oil which was Thicksotropic ?? Which became more fluid the more it was agitated, it was discovered later that when left it became acidic and ate metal. Glyn  look at his spare parts and came to the rescue providing me with some of the wheels I needed and the Scott spares scheme providing the rest. I now have a much better modern close ratio box for the bike.

    The bearings in the gearbox where shot and so where the bronze bushes so new bearings were purchased and I took some much better bushings out of another old gearbox and put it all back together. I have to say I did it about 8 times before I got it right but at the end of the day I was left with a usable box. As soon as the madness of Corvid 19 is over I will sent it up to Eddie to get it done properly but until then on with the next job, clutch!

    Keep safe everyone and best wishes to you all

    Edward

     

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    in reply to: 1929 Tourer BF8746 #30762
    Edward Irving
    Participant

    Your absolutely right Leif sometimes you have to compromise and the tank was the first.

    I should add that if anyone has a tank for a 1929 tourer and wants to exchange it for a wonderfully painted tank for 30’s flyer or anything else for that matter I would be very grateful to hear from you.

    The first thing that blew me away was the amount of detail you miss when things are painted. All of the wonderful Webb dampers are carefully stamped with patent numbers the frame had stamps and number on bits I hadn’t seen before. It was interesting to see what care and attention to detail these men and I am sure women of old put into building these wonderful machines. I must add that I didn’t have the wheels vapour blasted they where never painted maroon and although they are tatty and rusty in places I felt I could always go back to them later if needs be. So next job, on with the paint and before I new it my bike was black. Somehow I felt that if all else fails I have left one Scott a bit better condition than I found it.

    The forks where complete and when back together very well, the bushes where in good condition and apart from having to buy some knurled washers and a few new dampening pads there where no problems. What was hard was finding information about the Webb Forks used on Scotts. I do not know how many times I used the internet to try and work out if all Webbs are the same, if medium Webbs are right for a Scott. It would appear that every manufacturer under the sun copied Webb and you are never sure what your buying. Finally salvation came from the velocette  owners club who pointed me in the right direction. There I one or two things I learned, there are a few people making new parts for Webb hubs, you can get hold of most parts now and there is a contact in the Velocette club and who advertises in their magazine making new parts. I also learned of Jake Robins or Robinson who has a business on the south coast and can make complete new forks in the Webb style. Finally I learned that knurled washers are really expensive and that I needed a lathe !

    The next problem was the steering head, one of the original tapered bearings was shot and it wasn’t the standard inch bearing it was an old Timlin bearing 1764X which was obsolete. I remember demolishing a Timlin factory in Daventry and there being bearings all over the place if only I had picked a few up I might not be in this situation. Of course the problem was easily fixed by suggestions on face book and making contact with a few bearing factors. Bob your uncle stealing head went into frame, forks on and I had something which was starting to look like a bike.

    in reply to: 1929 Tourer BF8746 #30732
    Edward Irving
    Participant

    Photo of the tank attached

    Be safe everyone, take care please

    Next instalment tomorrow

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    in reply to: 1929 Tourer BF8746 #30731
    Edward Irving
    Participant

    Hi All

    Firstly yes Lewis your absolutely right we have a copy of the sales catalogue on this website. It is a fantastic archive and the time which has been spent scanning is hugely appreciated.

    Leif your right the route to an original restoration is a long and difficult path and I have to say I had no idea what I was / am letting myself in for.

    So having decided that I wanted to restore BF8746 to its original condition my next task was to see what I had and then work out what I needed. This is the point it got scary, honestly I don’t think I have ever considered giving up on Scotts but I did consider on more than one occasion giving up on this bike. There have been times when i shut the shed door and gave up on the job for a week or two but every time I did I found myself reading this or that copy of Yowl and heading back out to tackle the next bit.

    Every bike I have ever restored has had a manual, two in fact a parts book and a workshop manual but not the Scott. Yes there are parts books and yes there is the book of the Scott all of which are essential if you want to carry out a restoration but nothing like a step by step manual. I discovered the Technicalities, downloaded a copy, searched the web from top to bottom and pulled together every scrap of information I could find. The videos on you tube by Richard at Scott Parts are very helpful and a good watch. Then I had a break I went to my local Scott meet in London Colney and I found a wealth of information in the members that’s better than any manual.

    I stripped the bike down and put aside all of the original parts, frame, forks, under tray, gear box, seat, the hubs and engine although these last two weren’t original I figured I would keep them as a start and finally the tank. I assume that my chances of getting an original tourer type tank were next to none. All this went off to a local vapour blasters “Boris Blasting in Wellingborough who did a great job and was then painted up. I painted the frame and the forks etc myself with several coats of normal automotive black paint but the tank needed to look really good so I took it to a friend of mine who runs a business called Illusion race paint near the village of Roade in Northamptonshire. He used to do all of my race fairings and he really is an expert.

    in reply to: 1929 Tourer BF8746 #30726
    Edward Irving
    Participant

    Hi All

    Your right Lewis, I did have the right forks and they were in good nick but the radiator was not, gold paint it later transpired!

    Well I suppose before I get to unloading the bike and making a start the first thing I needed to do was come up with a plan. Should I stick with the idea of a modern and upgraded Scott, try to modernize it further. Should I leave it as it is just get it running and ride it for a bit or should I go the whole hog and restore it to its original state. I think it was Ernest Shackleton who said something like “achieving something is usually quite easy its deciding what to achieve that is hard”. I am note sure that applies to Scotts but I felt at the time like it applied to me.

    I should also say I am not a stranger to bikes or at least 2stroke bikes, I have restored my share, I have tuned some two strokes and I have raced a few as well. I don’t / didn’t have a lot of experience with machine tools, at the time I didn’t have a lathe but I had a good workshop with the normal tools and a drill press, that sort of thing. (if it gets to hard or complex I would prefer to find a friendly expert)

    It was a face book and another Scott enthusiast whos post guided me in the right direction, someone suggested that I obtained a copy of the original brochure for the 1929 Scott and that I got an idea of what the bike should have looked like. You can buy these from the National motorcycle museum or order them from Bruce Main-Smith & Company and I am sure before long we will have them on this website. Anyhow I opened the pages and suddenly there it was my bike or at least my bike as it had been (photo attached). Although at the time I hadn’t a lot of appreciation for what was involved in putting it back to original condition I made up my mind then and there that’s what needed to be done. The maroon was going to have to go!

    Take care and keep safe everyone

    Edward Irving

     

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Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 17 total)