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  • in reply to: New Member from North Germany #33501
    SwedScott
    Participant

    Hi Frank

    I have some parts that you might be interested in:

    A complete, right hand side, exhaust system. The nickel plating is not perfect and there is the almost obligatory mark from the kickstarter on the pipe. But it’s not bad, no rust or big scratches.

    One original foot change pedal that’s 20 mm longer than the one that’s fitted on my Scott. It’s 190 mm long centre to centre. Might suit big foots!

    If you’re interested:

    I understand the German language quite well but my German writing isn’t perfect. I you could supply me with your email address I could try to continue in German, if you can bear with my German grammar!

    Mit freundlichen Grüßen!

    Leif (aus Schweden)

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    in reply to: Handlebars/Sparkplugs #33481
    SwedScott
    Participant

    Hi

    I really like to recycle things rather than throwing them away. Here’s my route holder!

    Best regards

    Leif

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    in reply to: Handlebars/Sparkplugs #33475
    SwedScott
    Participant

    Hi Dave

    If the difference between “to clamp or not to clamp“ is small, I usually cut a strip from an aluminium beer/soda can and roll it to a ring. This ring can be placed between the clamps and bar (avoid overlapping the ring).
    SOFT aluminium is good to use for shims in some other applications too, as the ally surfaces adjust to the surfaces it squeezed between, and grips very well.

    Best regards

    Leif

     

     

    in reply to: 3 Speed Super spark plugs #33287
    SwedScott
    Participant

    Hi Keith

    As the saying goes, it’s hard to judge a book by its cover. The pair of AC 84 also have an uncommonly long centre electrode. I also have one AC 84-M (the marine version with nickel plated body) this one have a much more conventional centre electrode! Must have something to do with the internal construction, I think.

    Best regards

    Leif M

    in reply to: 3 Speed Super spark plugs #33285
    SwedScott
    Participant

    Hi Keith

    Neat job to shorten the insulator without cracking the whole thing! Watch out for overheating although because of the diminished surface area. But according to a one of my old books AC 87 could be a bit softer than Champion D21. Say could, as different old lists translate heat ranges differently. I did rummage through my little stock of NOS plugs as I remembered that I have a pair of AC’s. Unfortunately they turned out to be AC 84 wich is three steps cooler, so to say.

    I suppose that you have a radiator with neck, otherwise with a tunnel radiator it’s possible to raise the radiator. This by making an offset upper bracket and substitute the lower screw with a rubber cushion that the radiator rests on. By doing this I even got place for proper plug caps.

    By the way, I don’t think there are any other plugs shorter than the the AC ones. Can’t remember seeing any.

    Best regards and good luck!

    Leif

    in reply to: VMCC collaboration, latest Yowl. #33225
    SwedScott
    Participant

    I was a member of the VMCC many years ago but let my membership expire due to the continuous infighting in that club, at that time. I have no idea of how the situation is in the VMCC today. But I know that the SOC is a wonderful club, trough wich I have met a lot of friendly and helpful people. Some have become firm personal friends.
    Let’s keep yowling on in our own pace! Many thanks to all the people that runs the club!

    Best regards, Leif

    P.S. Please support our own forum!! D.S.

     

    in reply to: 3 Speed Gearbox Numbers ? #33178
    SwedScott
    Participant

    Hi Keith

    When I look closely at the front brake plate it looks very much like the BSA 7” one that was fitted on the B31/B33 models around 1950. I remembered it well since I, quite a number of years ago, renovated a BSA B33, 1951 model. Could be that the whole wheel was adopted from a BSA. From what I remember it’s  a decent brake and it blends well into the picture on your Scott, so nothing wrong with that. If anyone should know better about the brakes origins, please correct me!

    Best regards, Leif

    in reply to: Bad petrol taps #32552
    SwedScott
    Participant

    Hi again

    The brass taps with conical sealing are alright, as long as you have some oil in the petrol, doesn’t need to be much. Without oil they are horrible, with today’s “dry” petrol.

    Light sieze marks can be polished away with paste chrome polish, as Autosol. Don’t use anything coarser, as valve grinding paste. Just put some paste polish liberally on the cone and work the tap back and forth until satisfied. Big sieze marks = metal recycling bin!

    Best regards, Leif

    in reply to: Gearbox oil #32448
    SwedScott
    Participant

    Hi again

    Just thought that somebody could be interested in my “anti spill device”. Made from a cheap plastic T pipe for hoses. There was just enough wall thickness to, after turning off the serrations, to cut a W 1/2” thread. Cut off the unnecessary end and block the hole.

    Better leave it running overnight, once the oil have started running. There were much more in the jar next morning, but not a drop of spillage!

    Best regards, Leif

    • This reply was modified 1 year, 4 months ago by SwedScott.
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    in reply to: Gearbox oil #32369
    SwedScott
    Participant

    Hi Folkert

    Thanks for your answer. After asking around a bit more, I now intend to use Castrol D140 (GL3 rated), wich is a not an EP type oil. On the other hand I used Castrol EP 90 (GL4 rated) in Velocette gearboxes for many years, and didn’t notice any harm to the bushes. But as always, better safe than sorry! GL4 types of oil certainly contains less EP additives than GL5 (often used in rear axles). GL3 contains no EP additives, so it’s the safest choice of gearbox oil.

    Best regards, Leif

    in reply to: Spitting Back Again #32359
    SwedScott
    Participant

    Hi Will

    I just browsed through the posts and without really trying to get into your problem I noticed one thing. If you think it’s have something to do with the carburettor,  don’t forget the throttle cutout. It’s often overlooked and a too big cutout can lead to lean conditions and a too small can lead to rich. It mostly the region between idle and small throttle lift that’s affected. Every “stage” in a carburettor must perform faultless. Unfortunately I have no idea of what the right settings for your carburettor are.

    Best regards, Leif

    in reply to: Gearbox oil #32357
    SwedScott
    Participant

    Hi

    Thanks, both of you, for your answers. They have one thing in common, that you recommend semi fluid grease. Certainly a good thing for gearboxes lacking, or with old types of “seals”. I once owned  a Douglas 2 3/4 H.P. Anything  but semi fluid grease would escape from the gearbox very quickly. My own thought is why a Scott gearbox equipped with modern radial seals should need grease lubricant instead of (heavy) gearbox oil?

    Best regards, Leif

    in reply to: A Pile of Junk #32282
    SwedScott
    Participant

    Quite right Ted!

    It will even, per definition, be an “original“  because it will be the one and only!

    Velocette did the same, they used up old stock on certain models, so the model changes were sometimes very floating.

    Best regards

    Leif

     

     

    in reply to: A Pile of Junk #32280
    SwedScott
    Participant

    Hi again

    As an afterthought I can add a little story.

    In my relative youth I stumbled over a bike that I wanted to buy, but I couldn’t raise the money for it. It was a racing style bike with a famous brand on the tank. It was built by a retired coach builder, very well built, might as well been a factory job. It although had an engine and gearbox that newer was used by that make. Next time I stumbled over this bike was at a jumble, many years later. Then it had become a “racing department special“. I just stood there musing, thinking you don’t know what i know. There’s no original part, from the factory stated, on this bike!

    I think the moral is, we can’t always  stay clear of the “smart guys“ that’s inventing an history. But never buy anything with a “history“ that’s not VERY well documented in writing, if you pay extra for the history. If everyone followed this simple rule there would be no such “transformations“ as described above. Honest bikes built by honest people would remain just that!

    This should however not deter anyone from building up a bike of their liking. Have fun while you can. We can’t possibly foresee what fools do after we are gone!

    Best regards

    Leif

     

     

     

    in reply to: A Pile of Junk #32279
    SwedScott
    Participant

    Hi

    A fake is per definition something that has been made to look, more or less, like an original in the purpose to fool someone. When building up a bike from a pile of junk I think that a amount of  “artistic licence“ is allowed, without calling the the result a fake! I have always tried to make the bikes (and other things) to something that pleases myself. If I would like to build something that resembles, for example, a former racing bike I would gladly do it. But I just would follow the general lines of the original(s), not every detail. Just like Lewis thoughts about the subject. Then nobody can call the result a fake!

    Good Job Lewis, I know how much it is to create a nice, working bike out of  “a pile of junk“!

    Best regards

    Leif

     

Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 66 total)